What happens when you do not appear in court on a suspended sentance?

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What happens when you do not appear in court on a suspended sentance?

My boyfriend was convicted of misdemeanor domestic assault and battery in the pretense of a minor child. He was sentenced to 1 year suspended sentence and to counseling, plus fines. He has been paying his fines, he set up his counseling (paid the fees and set a date for his first class). He mistakenly confused the date and missed his first class; he scheduled another appointment and missed that one as well. He wasreported him to the court for non-compliance. He also had a review but, he did not know that  he had to appear, so now he has a bench warrant for not appearing in court. What do you suggest?

Asked on September 17, 2010 under Criminal Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I would suggest that he gets himself an attorney as soon as possible.  And I would suggest that the attorney call and set up a voluntary surrender rather than waiting for him to be pulled in before the court in handcuffs.  Then I would suggest that he gets his act together and his dates straight before they revoke his probation and they send him to jail for the offense.  That is a possibility you know. And I would really suggest that he go over and above what the probation requires to show the court that he really means to change his ways and that the prior act was a one time occurrence and not an everyday occurrence.  He is really going to have to work hard to set things straight.  Good luck.  


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