What does it mean in a workers comp case if you get a letter sayinig that you have a hearing to discuss the status of discovery and the status of the disposition of the case in chief?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What does it mean in a workers comp case if you get a letter sayinig that you have a hearing to discuss the status of discovery and the status of the disposition of the case in chief?

I don’t know what this means.

Asked on October 2, 2012 under Personal Injury, California

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Discovery is the litigation phase in which each party tries to obtain information from the other.  Discovery may include interrogatories (written questions to be answered under oath), request for production of documents (such as medical records, medical reports, medical bills, documentation of wage loss, etc.).  Other methods of discovery would include request for admissions (admitting or denying various facts), depositions (questions answered under oath).   

The hearing to discuss the status of discovery is to find out what discovery has been done and what needs to be done and the estimated amount of time to complete discovery.

The status of the disposition of the case in chief means what the parties will do to resolve the case; for example, go to trial or arbitration.  If arbitration is selected, will it be binding or non-binding.  If it is binding arbitration, the arbitrator's decision in the case will end the matter.  If it is non-binding arbitration, the arbitrator's decision may not be the end of the case because a party could challenge the outcome of non-binding arbitration.  If trial is selected instead of arbitration, will it be a jury or non-jury trial?  What is the estimate of time for a trial?

These are the types of issues that will be discussed at the status conference (the hearing referenced in the letter you received).

 

 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption