What course of action should I take on a business that only replaced 2 out of 4 brakes but for which I paid for replacement of all of the brakes?

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What course of action should I take on a business that only replaced 2 out of 4 brakes but for which I paid for replacement of all of the brakes?

I recently had to replace all brakes on my car. Soon after I heard grinding when braking and just the other day they bottomed out and the red brake light came on. I was scared so bad; I was afraid I was going to have an accident and kill someone or myself. My son took the car back only to find out the back brakes had not been done. They are now replacing those without cost. It seems to me the car should have been test driven before leaving property. What can I do about this serious matter?

Asked on September 9, 2011 under Business Law, South Carolina

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you paid for the replacement of all four (4) brake pads but only two (2) were replaced, you have an issue with the repair facility. However, your question does reference that the facility is now replacing the two (2) that it did not replace but charged you for at no cost, then you have no real damages in terms of actual dollars and cents to claim.

Most states have a bureau of automotive repairs to regulate and oversee licensed automotive repair facilities like the one you took your vehicle to. Its job is to investigate consumer complaints as well. California has such an administrative agency.

If you want to take your concerns further over what happened to you and your vehicle and the failure of the automotive repair facility to do what you paid it to do, you might consider contacting your state's bureau of automotive repairs assuming there is one and lodging a complaint.


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