What can I legally do about a boss that is always drunk and hostile?

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What can I legally do about a boss that is always drunk and hostile?

I am a sole employee at a detailing company. My boss is constantly drunk, he is very hostile towards me and customers as well. I am worried about my family financially because of this hardship. I am losing hours and now have the threat of the company closing. He is always screwing up my checks and thinks I can do what it would take 6 others to do. I am very frustrated about this and it is not only hurting me but my family as well. I need to know what I can legally do with this situation and soon. I do not know how long I can handle this anymore. It has been over a year.

Asked on October 4, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, you have very few rights:

1) Your boss has the right to be hostile and abusive to you (at least as long as it's based on discrimination against you because of your race, sex, religion, disability, or age over 40) and to customers, no matter how unfair that is or how bad it is for business.

2) He has the right to drink during the day, at work, etc., even to excess.

3) He has the right to give you too much work to get done.

In short, he has the right to an awful boss and human being and businessman. It's stupid for him to act the way you write, but the law doesn't require people to be smart.


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