What can I do to prove that I am innocent when somebody used my license during a speeding ticket in MA?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What can I do to prove that I am innocent when somebody used my license during a speeding ticket in MA?

I was working during the incident. I lost my Paycheck stub. I will have an appeal before a judge soon, what evidence would I need to bring, or get to help make a valid alibi? I do not know the vehicle that was pulled over by the officer. In the appeal, I believe the officer will be there. (he was not there for the hearing) The license that the offender used, was my old expired license that was considered invalid when I called my DMV in NY. But in MA, they do not scan the back of the id. I was told to have my boss write a letter with a letterhead stating my worked hours?

Asked on April 29, 2009 under Criminal Law, New York

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I think you have answered your own question. Have your boss write a letter on company letterhead stating that you were at work at the time of the incident in question.  If you can also get 1 or 2 letters from co-workers stating that you were there as well.  If possible, see if any of them might be willing to go to court with you to testify that you were in fact at work at the time in question.  A personal appearance might carry more weight with the judge.

Also, if the police officer appears he might remember that you are not the person that he gave the ticket to.  But that's a long shot considering how many tickets he/she probably gives out.  Also, since this is an appeal I assume some period of time has passed since the incident so his chances of remembering all the specifics of the case are realistically not good.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption