What can I do to prevent an eviction due to an accused lease violation, when no lease violation has taken place?

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What can I do to prevent an eviction due to an accused lease violation, when no lease violation has taken place?

I received a lease violation stating that I have to get written permission prior to having any appliances installed or altering anything in or around the apartment and that my washer and dryer have to be removed immediately or a legal process of eviction will take place. I have not altered, installed, or changed anything in the apartment. The washer and dryer are compact apartment size, standard 110 outlet, that do not require vents, and no installation is required for them to run. They are just sitting in and are not even plugged in.

Asked on July 31, 2011 Pennsylvania

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You need to carefully read your written lease for the unit you occupy signed by you and the landlord assuming there is one. Its terms control the obligations that you owe the landlord and vice versa. If there is a provsion in the lease requiring written permission forinstallation of appliances and the like, read it caefully to see if you actually violated its terms or not.

If you did not, write a letter to the landlord citing the specific provisions in the lease defending the claims against you and why you did not violate the lease's terms. Keep a copy of the letter for future reference. It seems that there is an issue as to the definition of "installation" presently between you and the landlord.

Good luck.

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You need to carefully read your written lease for the unit you occupy signed by you and the landlord assuming there is one. Its terms control the obligations that you owe the landlord and vice versa. If there is a provsion in the lease requiring written permission forinstallation of appliances and the like, read it caefully to see if you actually violated its terms or not.

If you did not, write a letter to the landlord citing the specific provisions in the lease defending the claims against you and why you did not violate the lease's terms. Keep a copy of the letter for future reference. It seems that there is an issue as to the definition of "installation" presently between you and the landlord.

Good luck.


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