What can I do if a landlord comes into my home without my knowledge and videos my property and sends it to my mother?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What can I do if a landlord comes into my home without my knowledge and videos my property and sends it to my mother?

On Friday at 5:30 my mom called me and said, “Did you know your landlord sent me a video of your house”. She came into my home when I was not around and took videos; I met with her the next day to pay rent and she did not mention anything to me. When I confronted her, she states that she was coming to do repairs and she told me a week ago. I feel my privacy has been breach and she doesn’t have a right to come in without permission.

Asked on July 28, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Arkansas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

What your landlord did is illegal. You could send her a letter, professional in tone, someway you can prove delivery, in which you state that you are aware that she wrongfully came into your home without permisson or notice, and also that she wrongfully videotaped your home and belongings and sent that video to you mother. Further, you could state that if she does this again, you will be forced to take legal action. If she does it again, you may be be able to sue her more monetary compensation and/or even potentially (depending on what she does) bring legal charges; if she does it again, consult with an attorney to discuss your options and best recourse.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption