What can I do about my personal property being stollen by a fellow employee?

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What can I do about my personal property being stollen by a fellow employee?

I currently work training horses for a
large horse barn. The other employees
are paid under the table with no
contracts, no tax deductions, and come
from sketchy backgrounds. The owner and
my boss does not allow me to store my
possessions in her locked room for the
night and I carry all of my things with
me everyday. One day as I was taking my
things to my car, I noticed I had
expensive personal possessions missing
that is needed for my work. The barn
does have working cameras in most
areas, including the area of interest.
I have a good relationship with the
owners and I asked them quite nicely if
they could please review the cameras so
that I could find out who it was, but
they refused and seemed offended. I’m
not sure what the next move is for me
as I wish to obtain my belongings back.
Thank you for your time.

Asked on June 22, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Ohio

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Your employer is not obligated to provide the security tapes to you except in the course of a lawsuit, if you use a subpoena or other legal process(es) to get them. However, if the police seek the tapes, they may provide them voluntarily, or the police may resort to mechanisms they have to get them. A good way to proceed would be to contact the police and file a report for theft; when you do, make sure they are aware that there are security cameras onsite which could reveal the thief, and which you have been denied access to.


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