What canI do about my girlfriend’s eviction if it was caused by my suicide attempt?

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What canI do about my girlfriend’s eviction if it was caused by my suicide attempt?

I tried to kill myself in her apartment while she was out of town. She had no knowledge of me being in her apartment. She is staying with her friends and can’t rent an apartment because she is being charged with the cost of cleaning and repairing the apartment. Is there any way to have the charges removed from her?

Asked on October 11, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you had the right to be in the apartment--not necessarily that particular time, but she had given you access, the keys, etc.--then is legally responsible for any repairs, including extraordinary cleaning, caused by your actions. In granting you permission to be in the apartment, she became responsible for your actions. The landlord can therefore charge her for those costs, and if she can't bear them, can evict her. You could try paying the costs for her--that might be the most effective, indeed only, way you can help her stay in the apartment. At the end of the day, neither you nor she can force the landlord to absorb or bear the costs for damage done by a guest of hers. If you or she can't pay all at once, try working out some payment plan or schedule; most landlords will be reasonable, if given a choice.

Note that if there is reason to think that you may pose a hazard to the property or other people (e.g. did you use gas or fire to try and kill yourself) that may itself be grounds for eviction--a guest of a tenant posing a threat.


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