What can I do if a repair shop damaged my computer?

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What can I do if a repair shop damaged my computer?

I took my laptop to a repair shop. He fixed my hard drive but lost my power cord. He said he would replace it for free and gave me a loaner cord. The loaner fried my mother board. So he had to order a new one. In the process of all this gave me a comp. loaner of his till mine got fixed. It froze and went real slow and then began to get real hot. Until one day I came home from work and it won’t work. I just received a call today that it’s fixed but I told him about his and he’s wanting to hold mine till I pay to fix his. I need to know if it’s normal wear and tear and if I have to pay?

Asked on September 22, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Florida

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

It seems to me that if the loaner computer was not in the best shape before he loaned it to you and you did nothing to cause it to "melt down" so to speak then it is not really your problem.  But he is holding your computer "hostage" until his gets fixed.  And who will fix his?  Him.  And how do you know what was really the problem with it?  You won't unless you bring it to someone else to fix.  And who wll have to pay for that?  You at first of course.  Until you take him to small claims court to have a judge or mediator sit down with the two of you and your "expert reports" (yours the diagnostic report from his computer and then his testimoney as to yours) and figure it out.  SOunds like a big hassle, doesn't it, but you may have no choice.  Unless you start an action against him for "conversion" of your property and return of the "bailment."  Good luck to you.


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