What can a bailbonds company do if I do not make payments on my bail?

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What can a bailbonds company do if I do not make payments on my bail?

10% of the bail was $11,000. I paid a little over $7000 using some money I had left over from an insurance settlement. I live off of social security and can’t afford to pay them any more and have not been paying for several months now. They keep calling but I don’t answer. I expect my court case to be resolved with in a week. But today they left a threatening sounding message saying that it is in my best interest that I talk to them. I’m out of money now and can’t afford payments with SSI. What can they do?

Asked on August 18, 2011 California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you fail to abide by the terms of your bail bond for payment of the $11,000 balance owed, the bonding company can file an action against you for the unpaid balance since its bond is at risk for your crimonal action and not all of your obligation has been paid by you.

You should contact your bail bondsman right away because your failure to respond to calls very well could be perceived that you are a flight risk putting its bond for you in jeapordy.

You need to return the calls sooner than later because avoiding the situation only makes matters worse. If the subject of owed money comes up, tell the truth and offer to make monthly installments in an amount you can afford.

Good luck.


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