What are the hotel laws dealing with turning away prostitutes and discrimination?

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What are the hotel laws dealing with turning away prostitutes and discrimination?

I am an employee at a hotel and recently we have had a sudden increase of prostitution acts in the hotel. However my hotel manager and her boss including our corporate office is telling my co-workers and my self we cannot turn them away during check in even if we strongly believe they will use the room to commit an unlawful act. My hotel brand seems to think its considered discrimination, is this true? If we obtain proof that they are committing a illegal act of prostitution may we ask guests to vacate? What are the laws abiding to this scenario?

Asked on June 29, 2012 under Business Law, Ohio

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

From what you are writing about it seems that the message that you received from upper management is that you are not to turn away any guests if you "believe" that they may engage in criminal acts.

Under the law, the possibility that the guests may engage in a criminal act is not a basis to refuse service to him or her. If the guest is actually engaging in criminal conduct your hotel can legally ask the guest to leave. However, to prove prostitution, one usually has to pretend to be a "john" and be wired to record evidence of prostitution as part of a police sting.


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