What are parent’s/family requirements to accept a parolee transfer from another state?

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What are parent’s/family requirements to accept a parolee transfer from another state?

Asked on February 21, 2013 under Criminal Law, California

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If your question is asking what is required of the parent/family, then the main rule is that if the person is going to live with a family, the family must continue to house the person and, on a periodic basis, allow for home inspections.  If the person moves, they should notify the parole officer of the move.  Because it's an interstate transfer, the family will have to comply with the rules of the original state and their home state.  These rules tend to vary, so the family should ask the parole officer what they expect for compliance from both states.  The area where most families tend to get into trouble is in the reporting of issues.  If the family knows that the person is committing new offenses or moves and is no longer residing in the home, they should report the move to the parole officer.  Pretending to house a person that does not actually live in the home can also cause problems for the host family.

If your question is what the qualifications are for the hosting parent or family, then generally the parole officer will determine suitability depending on the home, the nature of the offense that the defendant is on parole for, and the person's prior history (if any) while on parole.  The parole officer will not approve a person to reside in a parent's home if it is basically a drug house.  The idea is that the sponsoring family members have the ability to help the person continue on the right track.  If the offense involves injuries to small children, the parole officer may not approve placement in a home that has young children.  Again, each state has guidelines and the family may have to qualify with both sets of rules.


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