What are my rites of being falsely accused by a anonymous tip that turns out to be false?

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What are my rites of being falsely accused by a anonymous tip that turns out to be false?

At my job I have been told that an anonymous tip was called in stating that I was taking part in unethical behaviors according to our company policy. They have been searching for 2 weeks and have found nothing that proves this. Soon they will have to come out and say they found nothing wrong, what can I do to go after the person that made this fake tip. I was told that it was made anonymous so I don’t get to know, but don’t I have a right to know my accuser? What legal ground do I have for going after this person or company for false statements and mental anguish.

Asked on June 6, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.S., Member, Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

In the criminal context, you have a constitutional right to confront and cross-examine your accuser.  While an anonymous source may be used to establish probable cause for your arrest, it cannot remain anonymous if it is used as evidence to convict you.  In the civil/employment context, your rights are different.  If someone has said something false about you, you may be able to bring a civil suit based upon libel/defamation.  However, that would require you to be able to identify your accuser.  If you feel that your rights are being violated, I suggest that you consult with a skilled employment attorney.


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