What are my options if a trade agreement has been broken and a receipt changed?

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What are my options if a trade agreement has been broken and a receipt changed?

I made an agreement with a neighbor for work done on my yard for a large chain link kennel, to be removed by her. After fighting to get the work finished, and costs that I had to pay after the work was started that was not part of the agreement originally, she finally finished it. We made up a receipt and signed it. My printer was broken so I gave her a dime to go to the library and make a copy for me to which she said no problem. A year later she brings it to me and she has made changes to the original and gave me a copy of that. I would not have agreed to these changes. Do I have an recourse?

Asked on October 16, 2011 under Business Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you have an agreement with your neighbor where services were exchanged between you both as a thing of value and payment where your neighbor supposedly did not live up to her part of the bargin, you should do the following:

1. write her a letter demanding payment for the actual monies spent by you above the orignal agreement by a certain date. It is not write that you had to pay out of your own pocket monies for items that were part of her obligation to you.

2. if she does not pay you the extra amont that you expended by the demand date, then your option is small claims court.

As to the changes in the agreement made by the neighbor a year later, if you did not sign the document presented you after the changes were made by her, it is not binding upon you.


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