What am I libel for regarding giving contact information for a friend’s medical emergency?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What am I libel for regarding giving contact information for a friend’s medical emergency?

I gave my name as a contact person along with another person for a mutual friend’s medical emergency. The other person agreed in the presence of the patient to be medical power of attorney. We did not sign anything. What if anything am I libel for? My friend is doing well after surgery. The person who agreed to be medical power of attorney made it a point to rescind her power legally. Should I do the same?

Asked on November 13, 2016 under Business Law, Georgia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If you are simply a medical/emergency contact, then you are *not* liable for anything unless you do something deliberately wrongful--e.g. deliberately pass on incorrect information that harms the friend.
If you have a medical POA, you are *not* obligated to act or make decisions: the POA gives you authority, but does not require you to use it. IF you do make a decision for this person (if he is mentally incompetant, unable to communicate, etc.), you could in theory be held liable for the outcome of that decision, if you were *at fault* in some way in making it: going against the weight of medical advice and any wishes previously expressed by the friend, for example. But decisions made in good faith based on medical advice are not ones a person with a medical POA would be liable for. (And further: many POAs actually provide that their agent--the person given power--is not liable under or due to the POA; you can check what any POA says to see if it provides this additional protection.)


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption