We found out that one of our employees spent the corporate credit card on personal expenses. What should we do?

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We found out that one of our employees spent the corporate credit card on personal expenses. What should we do?

We found out that one of our employees made
personal purchases using the corporate credit
card. So far it adds up to 1700 but the number
could be much higher. We requested credit
card statements for the last 3 to find out if there
were other purchases that were made. How
should we proceed?

Asked on October 21, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

You can sue him to recover the money: personal purchases made on a corporate credit card which was issued to be used only for business purposes are theft, so you can sue to recover the money. IF the credit card company is providing you with the back statements, you may wish to get back statements for as long as this employee has had a corporate card, to see how much he has misappropriated, then sue once you know the total. If you are having difficulty getting the  statements, file a lawsuit against the employee for the money you already know he stole ($1,700), then in the course of that lawsuit, you can use the legal mechanisms of "discovery" (e.g. written questions and document production requests to the employee; subpoenas to the credit card company) to get more information to find the extent of his wrongdoing and amend what you are suing for to reflect the total.


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