What to do with a boat that wasn’t paid off in a bankruptcy and that still has not been picked up?

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What to do with a boat that wasn’t paid off in a bankruptcy and that still has not been picked up?

We are trying to find out what we can do to either receive the title for the boat or how to get the lienholder to pickup; it has been stored 6+ years. My husband filed for bankruptcy and it was discharged 6 years ago. He had a boat included. We have contacted the lienholder several times over the years to pick the boat up but we still have it. Is there anyway to force the title or something remove this boat from our property either by them picking it up or us selling it? The lienholder and title is from another state.

Asked on April 6, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Illinois

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If the obligation with respect to the boat has been discharged in bankruptcy and it has yet to have been picked up by the lender after all this time, I would write a letter to the lender stating that it needs to be picked in that so much rent for its storage has accrued (amount stated per month) since the bankruptcy discharge that you would be entitled to if it is not picked up in 30 days of the letter's date.

Keep a copy of the letter for future use.

If the lender does not pick up the boat and presumed trailer in the 30 day period, there is a process that you can go through with your department of motor vehicles to get legal title to the boat and trailer (like a car) as a lien holder for storing it. The best way to go through such process to possibly get legal title to the boat is to contact an attorney who practices in the area of automotive law.


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