Was accused of theft from employee at work. Accuser then finds her items and realizes she lost them on her own accord.

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Was accused of theft from employee at work. Accuser then finds her items and realizes she lost them on her own accord.

Girl lost ring at work. There is security footage of my ring falling and off my finger and me picking it up before the girl’s item went missing. The camera was not of a good enough quality to differentiate between the rings but I have proof of my own engagement ring clearly needing sized. I was humiliated and made to look like a thief. Lost out I work, worried of criminal case against me. Then the girl found her ring on her own accord. Can I sue her for lost wages? I would have settled for a public work apology but failed to receive one.

Asked on April 25, 2019 under Criminal Law, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

You could in theory sue her for defamation: for making to other people and publically (e.g. on social media) untrue factual statements or assertions against you which damaged your reputation. Whether it's worthwhile doing so, for three days wages (which appears to ve the provable consequence of her defamation) is something you need to consider carefully, since even if you sue her in small claims court, as your own attorney ("pro se"), you will lose at least one day's wage (the day of trial/court) doing so, and you cannot get that day's pay from her (there is no recovery in the legal system for the time you spend suing). So at best, you are talking about recovering the equivalent of two days wages, and as with any lawsuit, winning is not guaranteed.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption