Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Feb 16, 2020

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As is true of family courts across the nation, Vermont family courts strongly encourage divorcing parents to come to a cooperative agreement, outside of court, on raising their children after the divorce. If the parents are unable to come to an agreement, the court will step in to decide issues of custody, visitation rights, and financial support. In doing so, Vermont courts will almost always look to the best interests of the children involved. The following headings address laws governing Vermont child custody and support.

 

Vermont Child Custody:

Vermont courts will do everything possible to lessen the emotional impact on children of divorcing parents. If the parents cannot agree on a plan for custody, the courts will decide what is best for the children, and will give weight to factors such as one parent’s willingness to encourage a continued relationship between the children and the other parent, as well as any history of violence or abusive conduct by either parent.

Vermont Child Support:

Child support in Vermont is determined in accordance with the “Income Shares Model” for child support, where each parent’s income is considered in relative proportion. The support amounts calculated from each parent then help decide which parent must pay the other in order to maintain the correct proportion and provide for the needs of the child.

The Income Shares Model is not always followed, but a decision to follow a different standard will require supportive evidence showing 1) all the factors that affect the parties’ financial obligations differently, and 2) how applying a standard other than the Income Shares Model will more effectively preserve the best interests of the child.

Of course, a lawyer can help you to better understand your rights and responsibilities in terms of raising children after a divorce. A lawyer can also serve as your advocate and/or counsel when negotiating a parenting agreement. You can find a lawyer at:

Vermont Divorce/Child Support/Child Custody Lawyers:

Find an experienced Vermont Divorce Attorney at AttorneyPages.com
Find an experienced Child Support Lawyer or Custody Lawyer at AttorneyPages.com
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Vermont Divorce Laws: Click below to find the Vermont Divorce laws you’re looking for: 

Vermont Divorce Law, Lawyers & Attorneys
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Vermont Divorce Laws & Resources