What is my legal recourse if a university wrongfully promised that it was state certified for teaching special education but it is not?

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What is my legal recourse if a university wrongfully promised that it was state certified for teaching special education but it is not?

A on-line school promised I would be state certified in PA upon completion of my masters degree through them. I have graduated and have found out that the school is not recognized in PA although they have told me that they were. Now I am out over $25,000 and all the time I have lost and am quite possibly facing the loss of my job; not to mention the additional funding it will now take to go to school in a state certified school. I have been ripped off greatly and want my student loans reimbursed and will seek damages for lost time and school related expenses

Asked on August 10, 2011 Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You may be able to sue them for either breach of contract--not doing what they contractually committed to do, in exchange for your tuition--or for fraud--for making knowingly material (important) misrepresentations (lies) to persuade you to attend their school. If you can, you may be able to recover your tuitiion and other direct costs caused by them, or at least some portion thereof. A lot will depend on whether there were any disclaimers, caveats, limitations, etc. in their marketing material and/or in the agreement(s) you signed when you agreed to go there. You should bring copies of all their advertising and marketing materials, as well as of all agreements and other documents from them, to an attorney who can review them with you to see what your best recourse may be. Good luck.


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