Can you quit your job and still be eligible for unemployment?

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Can you quit your job and still be eligible for unemployment?

I quit my job initially because I lost my child care. I was only working part-time but it wasn’t the best environment to work in. I worked with very childish people who made my time there very uncomfortable. They would do things that would interfere with my job (i.e taking the cartridge out of my printer, emptying the paper, etc). I tried to ignore them but I feel they crossed the line. I went in to talk to my employer to work some hours out and saw someone had poked holes in the pictures of my 2 year old son’s eyes. I cannot work with people like this. Would I be eligible?

Asked on July 3, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You have a number of issues happening but understand that first you need to determine if you qualified for all benefits as a part time worker. If you did, then you need to determine in your state by contacting the unemployment agency if quitting your job can still keep you eligible for unemployment.  In many states, you can still qualify for unemployment, but you would qualify only if you lost your job through no fault of your own. Here, the fact that you could possibly argue hostile working condition or hostile working environment or even constructive termination could help you. File your claim; the longer you wait the worse it is but you wish to immediately contact an attorney to discuss it before you file so you don't tip off the former employer in case you have a viable lawsuit awaiting you.


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