What to do if I lied to the police to help a friend?

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What to do if I lied to the police to help a friend?

This idiot friend of mine ran into my apartment while he was running from a police officer. He failed to tell me this then when the police knocked on the door he said “just say you haven’t seen me,” then out of poor judgment I said he wasn’t there. Then he ran out the back door and they arrested him/detained me and charged me with “knowingly, without privilege to do and without purpose to prevent, obstruct or delay the performance by a public official do any act that hampers or impedes the performance of official lawful duties.” It is 2 am according to the ticker but the officer made it seem like it was just a fine? Is there jail time possible? I don’t want to take my chances?

Asked on September 4, 2012 under Criminal Law, Ohio

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

It is against the law to lie to the police.  It coud indeed be deemed obstructing justice and I am sure that your state has a separate charge for the lying to the police in an of itself.  Get legal help here as soon as you can.  

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

What happened is serious and a conviction with respect to the charge against you could have a negative impact upon you if it is a misdemeanor. As such, I suggest that you consult with a criminal defense attorney to see what can be done to assist in resolving the charge against you in an attempt to minimize any negagative result to you if convicted.

Possibly jail could be imposed upon you if convicted.


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