do I have a case against my job

for releasing my personal information that easy

and not having a more secure way of with

holding my personal information?

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do I have a case against my job

for releasing my personal information that easy

and not having a more secure way of with

holding my personal information?

I work for a well known top 5 bank. Today while on lunch I received a call from a number I did not recognize. I answered it and was asked for by my personal name. I did not recognize the person so I said they had the wrong number. As I was hanging up I got another call from an 800 number. So I answered it. It was from my customer service. As lunch was over and I went back to my desk, my co worker told me that I had a customer call for me. I looked at the number and it was the same that called me on my personal phone. So I called the customer and asked how he received my phone number and he said it was givin to him by customer service. After assisting the customer, I called customer service and they said that whoever released my personal phone number made a mistake but would not lead me to the person who released the information nor would they like to claim responsibility.

Asked on April 12, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

You can only recover, in a lawsuit, compensation equal to your actual losses, damages, or costs. One (or even a small number of) customer(s) calling you a few times on your personal phone number is not an "injury" for which you will receive compensation: you were not harmed other than being upset at the release of your information (and the law does not give compensation just for being upset), you haven't lost any money, you haven't lost a job, you are not being stalked, harassed, or threatened, etc. d on what you write, even if you were to sue and win, you would not get any money; therefore, suing would cost you money, since even if you were your own lawyer, you'd have to pay your own court or filing fees.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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