What can I do if a doctor has overbilled me?

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What can I do if a doctor has overbilled me?

I have seen a psychiatrist a few times. She said each session costs $125 so I paid $125 for 1 session and $75 for another session to pay the deductible. Now I see insurance didn’t cover the amount but she charged me for $150 each session. Also, I paid her a $20 co-pay for each session but she didn’t consider this in the bill. She doesn’t reply to my emails. What can I do?

Asked on October 14, 2016 under Business Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

You can refuse to pay more than the amount she quoted you: tell her in writing (even in email, though better would be to email and also send a certified letter with tracking) that the agreed upon amount was $125; you already paid her $20 per session as a co-pay;  you therefore only owe her $115/session; and therefore that is the amount you will pay--will she kindly send you a revised bill.
If she still does not respond, you can either send her a check for the correct amount--which she will likely (but not guaranteed) accept as payment in full, rather than suing you for an extra $40/session)--or send her nothing, and wait to see if she sues. If you end up in court, a court will listen to your and her testimony about the billing and decide who is right and how much is owed.
Your other options if you can't come to agreement with her:
1) Contact the state board which licenses doctors, including psychiatrists, and explain there is billing dispute: they may be able to help you.
2) If your time is more valuable than the additional $40/session that she thinks you owe, pay her the full amount to be done with this issue and don't see her again.


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