What can be done about a violent tenant?

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What can be done about a violent tenant?

I am a landlord of an multifamily apartment building. Recently one of the tenants violently attacked the superintendent. No serious harm occurred but a police report was filed and the ambulance was called. This tenant has had multiple confrontations over the years with several of the families in the building. He may also be under treatment for mental health issues, but I can not fully confirm this. What legal action can be taken against the tenant (aggressor)? Eviction?

Asked on December 21, 2010 under Real Estate Law, New Jersey

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

A tenancy of this type is governed by N.J.S.A. 2A:18-61.1.  Pursuant to this statute, a tenant can be evicted for what is called “good cause”.   A  list of the most common reasons to evict a tenant for good cause includes the following: (1) where the tenant owes the landlord rent; (2) damages caused by a tenant to the premises; (3) if a tenant refuses to accept reasonable changes or reasonable increases in rent; (4) where the tenant does not abide by the rules of the landlord, the lease or is disorderly and bothering other tenants (your situation); (5) and several other reasons as listed in the statute. 

However, there are many procedural requirements and notices that must be given properly in order to have the grounds to evict.  You should consult directly with an attorney in your area before beginning any eviction proceedings.


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