Analyze Your Tax Debt Resolution Options Before Contacting The IRS

Many Americans who owe the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) money don’t fully understand the variety of IRS debt resolution options available to them. Justin Hein, Managing Attorney for Roni Deutch, A Professional Tax Corporation’ a law firm that has been resolving IRS tax debts for American taxpayers for nearly 20 years’ says that many taxpayers don’t have enough information before trying to deal with the IRS.

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IRS Tax Debt: Answers To FAQs

The Internal Revenue Code is complicated and constantly changing. Justin Hein, Managing Attorney for Roni Deutch, A Professional Tax Corporation’ a law firm that has been resolving IRS tax debts for American taxpayers for nearly 20 years’ provides answers to some common questions.

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How to Handle an IRS Tax Debt

Millions of Americans have or will have Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax debt. For many taxpayers, it can be confusing and overwhelming to determine how to resolve their tax debt. In fact, tax attorneys say that most taxpayers are not even aware of the various forms of IRS tax debt help that are available to them.

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When should I hire a tax attorney to represent me in my IRS tax debt dispute?

While most negotiations with the IRS over your tax debt can be handled by the average American taxpayer, there are some instances where an attorney is both necessary and beneficial. If the IRS ignores your attempts to correct the mistakes, it is time to contact an attorney. An attorney can draft your letters to the IRS in a more direct way that is guaranteed to get the IRS’s attention. Those taxpayers who do not qualify for the Streamline Offer in Compromise program should consider hiring a tax attorney to handle their IRS negotiations. An attorney can better negotiate with the IRS and help them fully understand your financial situation, framing it in the way that the IRS needs to hear for offer acceptance.

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How long does the IRS have to collect back taxes?

The time period (called statute of limitations) within which the IRS can collect a tax debt is generally 10 years from the date the tax was officially assessed. For most cases, the IRS has 3 years from the date the return was filed to audit a tax return and determine if additional tax is due. The time to audit taxes can be extended.

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