Supervisor forgot to log off common computer

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Supervisor forgot to log off common computer

At work, supervisor did not log off computer and walked away. I later came by and sat at computer. I later went away and did other things and then came back to sit at the computer, thinking one of my co-workers had logged on we often share computers to save log in/log off time. I logged into a program that needs a separate log in. Supervisor realized she had left open computer, came back and saw me on it and eventually accused me of reading her e-mail. I did not. I logged off immediately when she informed me she was the person logged on, and logged on myself right after. She initiated disciplinary actions against me because of this. her own statement acknowledges that I got onto the computer after she left, so I had no way of knowing she was original person logged onto it.

Asked on September 12, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

You don't have recourse, unless your employment is subject to a written employment contract (including a union agreement) or civil service rules which give you the right to a hearing or require that charges or claims against you be proven in some way--if you have such an agreement or civil service rules, you are entitled to whatever protections and recouse they give you.
But without the above, you are an "employee at will" and your employer (e.g. your supervisor) can discipline you in any way she wants, for any reason, even unjustified, unfair, or factually incorrect ones. Employees at will have essentially no rights or protections at work.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption