CanI sue the military/state if medical bills have gone unpaid regarding an on-duty injury?

Get Legal Help Today

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

CanI sue the military/state if medical bills have gone unpaid regarding an on-duty injury?

I’m in the Army national Guard in MA. Long story short, I was injured in training, came home and was cleared to seek treatment via our clinic (Hanscom AFB). They sent me to Lahey Clinic to seek further treatment and my unit is responsible for the medical bills. However they aren’t paying. I’m being negatively discharged for absences due to my line-of-duty disability and am forced to file bankruptcy because of the unpaid bills. No one will return any phone calls or emails with any information for over 4 months now. Can I sue them for damages?

Asked on September 22, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, New Hampshire

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you were injured on a training exercise for the Army National Guard, you need to consult with a worker's compensation attorney about your injury and the resulting medical expenses and their payment.

I would also get a copy of your unit medical insurance policy and contact the carrier to see what the problem is for getting your medical bills paid. You might also consult with an attorney that practices personal injury and insurance law about your situation and whether or not you have a basis for bringing a lawsuit against your health insurance company and your resulting medical bills.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption