What to do about student loan fraud and forged signatures?

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What to do about student loan fraud and forged signatures?

My father forged my signature and my mother’s signature on 2 expensive student loans. The loans are currently in deferment as I am now in graduate school, but I just found out about this and I don’t want to be responsible for paying back these loans if my father doesn’t pay them. He likely won’t be paying themas he has plenty of debt and financial problems on his own and a serious gambling addiction. I never saw this money in my life, nor did I even need so much because my college tuition at UCSB didn’t cost that much. I want to settle out of court so that I don’t have to pay anything.

Asked on July 27, 2011 California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

First, you need to confront your father about what you just found out and what he did with the money assuming you never received any benefits from these two expensive student loans to see what he will be able to do about paying them off and what was done with the money.

If he is unwilling to do the right thing, you need to set up a meeting with the entity in charge of the two student loans and their repayment to discuss what happened. You will need to see the copies of the checks paid, the original loan application and other documentation showing where the checks were sent. Potentially the entity will not expect you to personally pay off the loans after a thorough investigation is done.

However, there is a good chance that a criminal investigation and even criminal charges may be filed against your father for fraud and forgery. If that happens, then your family will be suffer as a result in more ways than one.

Good luck.


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