What to do if someone is saying that I ordered stuff online with his bank card but there was no way for me to get his bank card when it is on him all of the time?

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What to do if someone is saying that I ordered stuff online with his bank card but there was no way for me to get his bank card when it is on him all of the time?

I’m never home and work full-time so how could I get his bank card and order stuff online. It’s impossible. I’m never home and when I am, I’m either helping my dad or sleeping for work. How far this investigation go, when I have no way to access his bank credit card and the guy is 95 some years old and getting memory loss.

Asked on August 4, 2013 under Criminal Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The investigation will go until either they find evidence or conclude that they will *not* find evidence. Since there are multiple ways you could get access to a person's bank card information--which is what's needed; not the physical card--without taking the bank card from someone, nothing you write, by itself, exonerates you. For example, you could have hacked his computer or "phished" for the information; you could have had a friend obtain the information for you (such as someone who works at a retail store or bank); you could have gotten the information through you own work, if the gentleman ever did business with your workplace; you could have purchased his account, etc. number from someone else who stole it; etc. Furthermore, if any items or services purchased with his bank card were delivered, directly or indirectly to you, that would itself be compelling evidence of your guilt.


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