Should we submit a report to our local police for neighbor dispute?

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Should we submit a report to our local police for neighbor dispute?

We have a question about a dispute with our neighbor. Our neighbor has dogs which come out a few times during the day and sometimes after 7 pm. The dogs bark, which wakes, our sleeping new born baby. We tried being peaceful talking with our neighbor about findings a mutual agreeable compromise. However, the recent time the neighbor slammed the door on us without

speaking. Then, the neighbor called the police saying ‘we are the ones

harassing them. The police came and talked with both sides. The police didn’t really listen to our full story. The resolution is neither of us will go on each

others properties, or else issue will escalate. Next time, all we can do is

call non-emergency police line for noise reporting Should we submit a report to our local police on the full side of our story or do we just leave this to rest until next issue occurs?

Asked on March 14, 2016 under Criminal Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

The police have already been out, so there is already somewhat of a record of the event.  If you are concerned, however, that the event was not property documented, then I would set up a meeting with the police chief or a detective to express your concerns. 
That addresses the reporting issue... but you still have a problems with noisy neighbors.  If it continues, consider hiring an attorney to send a simple demand letter... to the effect of straiten up or we'll sue.  It communicates a message of 'straiten up', but is also takes you out of the middle and the dred of having to deal with the lousy neighbor.


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