should my daughter go to a lawyer?

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should my daughter go to a lawyer?

My 28 Yr. old daughter just got a speeding ticket for going 42 in a 30 in Myrtle beach. She had just turned off the highway and was going down an incline. we think it was a speed trap. Should she just pay the fine or go to a lawyer?

Asked on May 16, 2009 under Criminal Law, North Carolina

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

Traffic tickets are costly.  Not only must you pay the fees associated with each infraction, you'll also accumulate points on your driving record. After six points, you'll receive a notice from the Department of Motor Vehicles requesting that you drive with more caution, and advising you of the consequences of a suspended license.  In the event that your license is suspended, you'll also have to pay to have it reinstated.

And as if all that extra money isn't bad enough,  each traffic ticket, and the accumulation of points, is reported to your insurance company and your premiums are likely to increase.  On a twelve point driving point system, that can mean that you are already half way to having your license suspended for up to one year. 

If you retain an attorney in the area of where this all happened they will have contacts and know local custom.  He/she may be able to help reduce the impact of all of this on the status of your driver's license by possibly negotiating for reduced charges. 


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