Should I contact OSHA?

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Should I contact OSHA?

There have been rats in my work building for a long time. I asked many times for someone to check and no one did so I opened a ceiling tile and recorded the findings which were dead rats, mold, and rat droppings all over the ceilings. I submitted a safety miss and included an OSHA quote, which was about a workplace free of rats and they finally patched holes. A member of the department responsible tried to intimidate me and tell me I was wrong even though I had proof. Since then, about 3 weeks ago, they did set traps and the point of contact with the pest control company that set them claims they have been checking them regularly but our records show that no one has been here. The safety manager just came into my office recently and asked if anything had changed. I told him no, that nothing had been cleaned yet either and he told me not to expect anyone to clean. There is still rat feces all over the ceiling tiles that we are breathing every day and my employer will not take any action. I emailed the manager of safety, asking for an update and a plan of action over a week ago and she has yet to respond. I have gone through everyone I can to this point and I am unsure what other action I can take but I would like a clean workplace to work in.

Asked on March 18, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

It would be advisable to contact OSHA because your worksite is hazardous to your health and the health of other employees. OSHA will order your employer to clean up the rat problem. Your employer is prohibited from retaliating against you for filing a complaint with OSHA.


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