Should I be concerned for my job if I went to HR about discrimination in the workplace and they put me on paid leave?

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Should I be concerned for my job if I went to HR about discrimination in the workplace and they put me on paid leave?

I currently work for a large non-profit company. I am the only woman on my team and since I began at my job over 8 months ago I have been severely discriminated against. I finally built up the courage to approach the head of HR about it after trying to talk to my direct supervisor and my piers with no benefit. Historically, the department I am currently in has not been able to retain female employees – they all quit after a month or so because of the way they are being treated by their direct piers and management. I care about the job I do and I decided instead of being treated unfairly to the point that it affects my work negatively I would try to resolve the issue. When I made HR aware of what has been going on for example, co-workers calling me names like

Asked on May 24, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Colorado

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Contact the federal EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) or your state's equal/civil rights agency. To put the person bringing a complaint of sexual harrassmet or discrimination on leave itself appears to be discriminatory or retaliatory behavior (which is illegal: the law does NOT let you retaliate against someone who brings a complaint in good faith). That, coupled with the history or backnground information you describe, suggests your company is engaged in illegal discrimiantion. And make no mistake--it is illegal to discriminate against or harass women due to their sex. You have rights; based on what you write, a call to the agency is warranted.


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