How does salaried exempt payroll work?

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How does salaried exempt payroll work?

I work in the office of a manufacturing company. Salaried people, like myself, work 48 hours a week as a standard 10 hours M-Th and 8 hours Fri. Our paystubs show only our agreed weekly salary except when a day off is taken. Then our paystub shows 8 hours PTO and 32 hours at our hourly rate. However, when we do take 1 day off, we still work 38 hours as a standard. Shouldn’t we at least be paid for the quantity of hours actually worked, 38 actual hours worked versus 32 hours? Fridays worked seem to be

Asked on October 22, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

If you are salaried exempt, your annual salary is divided by 52 weeks to find an effective weekly salary, and that weekly salary is divided by the number of days in your normal work week to find an effective daily salary . Any day you either work at all (even a short day or fewer than normal hours) OR don't work but have and use a day's PTO, you get that day's salary. You do not get extra pay for working more than 40 hours or working additional days durinfg the week (e.g. if you usually work M-F, you don't get extra pay for Sat. or Sun. work). The maximum you can get a week is your weekly salary, even were you to not sleep and work 168 hours. However, you can get less than your weekly salary if you do not work one or more days while using PTO (or having paid hoilday, if your company offers them) for the unworked days.


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