Is there a way to get out of the lease for personal and family safety reasons?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Is there a way to get out of the lease for personal and family safety reasons?

I am living in a rental home. My house was broken into and robbed 2 weeks ago. We filed a police report and notified the landlord of the damages. The damages were repaired and now we went outside to find out truck stolen from our driveway. This doesn’t seem a random act as we’re the only house on the entire street being targeted. Is there a way to get out of my lease early because of the multiple thefts when I have police reports on both incidents? Also, there are already a couple of known gang members and felons in jail for the crimes and more names are coming out.

Asked on April 11, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, unless your written lease has a provision allowing you to end it without recourse due to safety issues, you cannot get out of it without suffering possible consequences with your landlord with one exception.

The exception is if the landlord knew before you leased the unit the property was in a high crime area and did not disclose this material fact to you before you entered the lease. Proving such knowledge by the landord is pretty hard to do.

The other way to get out of your lease without recourse is if you are on a month-to-month lease. If so, just give your landlord the 30 day written notice to end your lease.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption