Are roommates boyfriend’s living atour house supposed to pay rent?

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Are roommates boyfriend’s living atour house supposed to pay rent?

House is rented by 5 girls. 2 of the girl’s boyfriends live there full time as their own home with access to the house as they wish. They refuse to pay rent and utilities or be added to the lease because the other 3 girls have had boyfriends overnight and the 2 boys said they should have to pay also. Do the frequent overnight guests who are only in the house with their girlfriends, have no belongings and have their own apartments have to pay the same amount as the ones who live there full time.

Asked on September 26, 2011 under Real Estate Law, New Jersey

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

I think that you have a very valid point here but what you are going to do about it is going to be tricky.  Technically the two full time boyfriends are sub tenants or squatters and I bet you 10 to 1 that the situation is in violation of the ease agreement with the landlord.  Read the lease and see what it says.  See what it says about the landlord's remedies - usually to call you all i breach and to request remedy of the situation.  But be careful here.  The fall out may not be as you hope.  If the landlord can he or she can try and evict you from the premises.  But it could give you some leverage here if you wish to advise your room mates that they are in breach and you are going to advise the landlord. Check with a tenant's rights organization in your area.  There are many scenarios that may work.  You just have to find one that fits your situation best.  Good luck.


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