What to do about a negative credit notation that was due to no fault ofmy own?

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What to do about a negative credit notation that was due to no fault ofmy own?

I had an accident in 02/09; I was admitted to the hospital for 3 hours. The bill came to $3000; my car insurance company paid $2000; I filed a claim with my secondary insurance company for the remaining $2,000. My secondary insurer took almost 1 year to settle the claim and they finally paid in 09/10. In the meantime the collection agency reported the medical bill to a credit bureau which is reflects this on my credit report. Consequently my credit score is very low. Is there anyway that I can remove this notation from my credit history?

Asked on January 31, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

First, you have to recognize that you were in fact responsible. Whether or not the insurer took a long time to settle, you had an obligation to pay the bill. You needed to either pay it and then seek insurance reimbursement, or you could perhaps have spoken to the creditor and gotten them to agree to not take action until the insurance was resovled. However, either way you needed to do something; if you didn't, then given that you were obligated on the bill, as unfair as it seems, you are responsible for the default.

You can therefore not necessarily "remove" this information, since it's accurate. You can ask the credit bureau(s) to include an explanatory statment about the situation, which may help; other than that, you'll need to wait until the information leave your credit score in a few years, and in the meantime take steps (like responsible use of secured credit cards) to build up your rating.


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