If I received an out of state speeding ticket, can I reduce the amount of the fine or substitute the fine for something else such as a driver’s education course, defensive driving course or volunteer work?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If I received an out of state speeding ticket, can I reduce the amount of the fine or substitute the fine for something else such as a driver’s education course, defensive driving course or volunteer work?

The speed limit was 55 mph but I was pulled over for going 82 mph. I received a $355 fine. I am 19 years old, and I have never received so much as a warning for speeding before. I was under the impression that the road I was on had a 70 mph speed limit and thought 82 was fine since there were no other cars in sight on the road. I am in a situation where $355 will heavily impact my budget for the month in terms of meeting my basic needs.

Asked on July 10, 2015 under General Practice, Virginia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

The court may be willing to give you a payment plan for the fine; or they *may* (you can't count on it; it's purely voluntary on the part of the court) be willing to give you some substitute, non-monetary penalty. Call the clerk of the court, explain the situation, and see if there are any options and how to pursue them (e.g. by a letter to the judge).

For future reference: 1) not knowing the speed limit on a stretch of road is not a defense; 2) going *any* speed over limit is a violation--while the police tend to not pull over people going just 5 or 10 miles over on a highway, they could; and 3) the fact that there are no other cars around is not a defense to speeding, either.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption