Real Estate – Massachusetts, tenant and sub-letter relations

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Real Estate – Massachusetts, tenant and sub-letter relations

I recently sublet my room to another student at my university. I had been studying abroad and the lease began before I was able to return to the states. The sub-let was for the month of June only. The sub-letter filled out the rental application form and was approved by the landlord, however, she did not sign the lease or a sub-let agreement form. The sub-letter collected the keys and moved in, only to leave the next day. She left only a note saying there was an emergency and left no other explanation. Can I (the tenant) force her to pay the rent for June?

Asked on June 15, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

if she signed the paperwork agreeing to occupy the premise for June and pay the rent than yes, it was a contract that she is liable for. She contracted to live and pay for the month of June and if she failed to follow through she is still responsible for the rent.

All this is assuming she did sign the contract which it seems you said she did. With that being said you may want to hire a local attorney who can contact her and explain the situation because a lawsuit may be cost prohibitive being its only one months rent and it will not be worth the time and money you will expend to pursue it in court. But usually a letter from a lawyer could be enough to get her to pay


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