Promise to pay wages while closed/moving

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Promise to pay wages while closed/moving

The lease was up at the building we worked out of, so we had to
move with short notice. I work at a veterinary hospital. I was
promised to be paid for the time I would have worked had we been
open. In the beginning, it was supposed to be 2 weeks, but I have
been off since June 25th with no info on when they will be open
August 15 that’s 7 weeks. I was paid August 2nd payday for 25 hours,
after I sent a message that I would contact BOLI and an attorney if I
didnt receive the balance of 90 hours pay by that Friday. I work 23
hours a week, I received the balance of 90 hours on August 7th.
Payday is tomorrow and I dont see in the View my paycheck on
Intuit that there is a check to be deposited. I want to know if I have a
case to demand my pay. Also, I was told yesterday that the Doctor
would be emailing layoff notices but I have not receive anything from
anyone.
What can I do? I have waited around and been strung along this
entire time. Almost all communication is via text which I have and is
converted to a document.

Asked on August 15, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Oregon

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

The promise is not enforceable: you gave the employer nothing (or at least, you don't write that you gave the employer anything) in exchange for this promise. But for a promise to be enforceable, it must be part of a contract; a contract requires that each side give or promise the other something of value ("consideration") to be enforceable. If one side (i.e. you) doesn't give or promise the other side (your employer) something of value, there is no contract, and a non-contractual promise is not enforceable in court or by the law.


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