Under what conditions can a landlord enter your rental without permission?

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Under what conditions can a landlord enter your rental without permission?

Our landlord walked into our house without permission because he said he has the right to do so when no one answers the door and he sees broken glass. Glass had broken inside the door which is now currently fixed. He says from now on he will be doing spot checks on the house before prior notice. Can he do this? He also walked into the house the other day without prior arrangement and walked into the bedroom on 2 of the tenants. He says it is his house and he can do what he wants or he will just kick us out. Can you tell me is what he is doing legal?

Asked on September 27, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Wyoming

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In most states n this country there are statutes stating when a landlord can enter his or her rental. In most circumstances reasonable notice must be given first either by telephone, letter, or e mail. In most circumstances 24 hours is deemed reasonable notice.

However, in certain circumstances no notice is needed for the landlord to enter the unit. One example is when the landord sees something indicating a crime has happened or that immediate danger exists. The broken glass you have mentioned is such an example allowing immediate entry.

However, spot checks inside the rented unit need advance notice to the tenants. Too many spot checks in a short period of time could be deemed inappropriate and a form of harassment.

Good luck.

 


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