What can we do if our HOA Board of Directors refuses to hold open board meetings?

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What can we do if our HOA Board of Directors refuses to hold open board meetings?

Our Board labels their board meetings as executive sessions and excludes all members from attending the non-executive session part of their meetings. We are given no notice and no information about what they are deliberating about. They hold quarterly open forum meetings to fill us in on all the decisions they’ve made and the money they’ve spent. I have given them articles to read about the HOA civil codes, but they ignore them, and the property manager agrees with them. What can we do?

Asked on July 23, 2011 California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If the covenants, conditions and restrictions for the association where your property is located and the oprating rules of the association require open board meetings for members to attend, and this is not being complied with by the associaiton's board members, you should do the following: 1. you and other members write the board about their violations, keeping copies of the letters for future use if need be, 2. consult an attorney about the apparent violations and make a decision on the suggestions.

The association's board members even after a closed meeting typically are required to prepare minutes from the meeting to be placed in the association's books for all members to review.

Perhaps a letter from an attorney that you have consulted and retained will change the improper closed door meetings in the future by the association's board.

 


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