Whatis my recourse if a co-worker wrote a completely falsee-mail to my office saying that I am pregnant and planning to abort the child?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Whatis my recourse if a co-worker wrote a completely falsee-mail to my office saying that I am pregnant and planning to abort the child?

I told the story of my affair to a colleague and he had some previous problems with the guy I was talking about. So he wrote an e-mail to my office from a fake account that my ex-boyfriend does not hold good character. He also wrote that I am pregnant because of him and planning to abort the child. I have been publicly embarrassed over this. I want to take legal action against him. What I can do?

Asked on April 26, 2011 under Personal Injury, Alaska

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You could potentially sue him for defamation. Defamation is the public--and that includes even to one other person (e.g. the recipient of the email) making of a false factual statement that damages a person's reputation and/or causes others to not want to work with him or her. From what you write, you may have a claim for defamation, and you wish to discuss it with a personal injury attorney.

Also, it's possible that the colleague violated internal company policies, standards, codes of conduct, etc., and if so, it may be possible to report him to senior management and/or human resources and have the company take some action (e.g. suspension; firing) against him. This depends on what your company policies are and how they tend to react to inter-employee problems.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption