Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Jan 10, 2020

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Estate property that cannot bypass probate must go through the Ohio probate system via the Court of Common Pleas, but there are many exceptions. For example, estates under $35,000 in total value are completely exempt from the Ohio probate courts, as are estates less than $100,000 in value in which the surviving spouse is the decedent’s only heir. Disputed, complex, or extremely valuable estates will most likely end up in probate court, where they will be resolved by a court-appointed executor for a flat percentage fee of the estate’s value. In addition, estate taxes are assessed on all estates in the state of Ohio.

If you are involved in a complex or disputed estate, you will probably wish to hire an experienced Ohio probate attorney to help you with court filings, negotiations and follow-through with the court. Otherwise, the system is relatively easy to navigate for the do-it-yourselfer.

For more information, check out our article on the Basics of Ohio Probate