Nuisance neighbor

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Nuisance neighbor

I live in a mobile home park in which the mobile homes are spaced about 50 feet apart, my neighbor uses his back emergency door as his front door so every time I leave my home, there he is. He has

turned the back of his house into the front, therefore he is facing me and although he is still on his property it is very distressing to me. No one else in the entire Mobile home park does this. I feel I am entitled to a certain amount of privacy but unfortunately I’m not getting that. I would like to sell my

place and move somewhere else but I’m afraid that prospective buyers will see what he’s done and not want to purchase my place, I mean who wants to have a neighbor less than 50 feet away, facing them, to where every time you step out your door, there’s your neighbors looking at you And the kicker is, is that my neighbors know what they’re doing is wrong even though they’re still on their property. I mean just because it’s your property doesn’t make it right. Correct?

Asked on September 3, 2017 under Real Estate Law, Alaska

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

This is not a nuisance in the eyes of the law. A nuisance is an activity inappropriate for the neighborhood: a loud bar playing music outdoors until 4 in the morning in a residential neighborhood; or an auto wrecking yard, slaughterhouse, or concrete manufacturing plant in a residential area, for example. But whether you like it or not, there is nothing legally inappropriate about someone using their back or side door instead of their front, or spending time on any part of their proprety (e.g. in the backyard instead of front). A person using one of the doors to his home or standing in his own yard is simply not legally inappropriate, and so there is nothing you can do about this.


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