Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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Written by

Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

Full Bio →

Reviewed by Jeffrey Johnson
Managing Editor & Insurance Lawyer

UPDATED: Mar 9, 2020

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Domestic violence is a huge area right now for New York police and the New York courts. Elliot Schlissel, a New York criminal law lawyer whose firm represents individuals charged with criminal matters, says that domestic violence situations are best handled by an experienced attorney who understands how the process differs in New York City courts versus Long Island courts.

New York batterers’ programs & anger management programs

In domestic violence situations, usually one person, whether from the opposite sex or the same sex, threatens or assaults another person. The large majority of domestic violence cases are initiated by women, according to Schlissel, and the courts are sensitive, sometimes overly sensitive, to their complaints. He explained how these cases are handled:

In these situations, we often put the person charged with the crime, whom we represent, into a program to educate the individual that there are other ways of dealing with anger and frustration than taking it out on someone else. These programs are often called “batterers’ programs,” or “anger-management programs.”

We represent many men who are charged with criminal activity related to domestic violence incidents which unfortunately can lead to restraining orders. We aggressively represent men, although we will cooperate with the D.A.’s office in some situations to get them to withdraw the charges. We’ll also take these matters to trial and show that we have a self-defense situation where the real aggressor was the female and not the male. On the other hand, my office has worked with organizations that represent women who are battered girlfriends and spouses.

Schlissel says that there are similar batterer and anger management programs in the City of New York, especially in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. Having practiced this area of law in these metropolitan areas and in Long Island’s Nassau and Suffolk counties for over 30 years, he admits that Long Island courts tend to prosecute these matters more aggressively than the metropolitan courts. He says that hiring an attorney who is familiar with all of these courts and their individual processes and nuances has been very beneficial for his clients.