What are my options for handling a neighbor who is harassing tenants in my rental property?

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What are my options for handling a neighbor who is harassing tenants in my rental property?

I have owned a rental property for the last four years. Over this time, the neighbor has harassed each tenant I have had in the residence. Three tenants have moved out because of his behavior. The neighbor is a single male approximately 30 years old. The behavior consists of cussing at adults and children, flipping the middle finger, spitting at car windows, verbal barrage such as telling the tenant their f’ing renters or white trash, physically threatening them. The police have been called multiple times, but they just maintain the peace and don’t do much.

Asked on August 20, 2011 California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You have a nuisance problem with this neighbor who has been costing you time and money. If you can document the pattern of harassment and abuse by this neighbor to you and your tenants, you need to retain an attorney and seek a restraining order against him from at least coming onto your rented property and to keep away from your tenants that want to be left alone.

You need the cooperation of your tenants as well who want to be left alone from the abusive neighbor by joining with you in the request for the suggested restraining order to also be petitioners/plaintiffs with you.

Assuming you are successful in getting the restraining order against the abusive neighbor, any future harassment would result in another action for violating any terms of the issued restraining order by the court.

Good luck.


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