If my supervisor told me it would be fine for me tor drop down to part-time since things weren’t going to change, so 5 months later it did am I able to get my position back?

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If my supervisor told me it would be fine for me tor drop down to part-time since things weren’t going to change, so 5 months later it did am I able to get my position back?

I work in a spa as a massage therapist. I was a full-time employee and was tired of how appointments were being booked. Some days the part-timers were getting more appointments. He explained that he tries to keep things balanced among all employees regardless of statu and full-timers get health insurance. That was the only difference, health insurance and longer hours. I spoke to my director and HR department. They thought it was fine. After a couple years of this and holding a meeting about it, I decided to drop down to part-time. It made better sense given the fact I have 2 kids to care for and we were on 10 hour shifts. Before I made the permanent change, I asked my supervisor if he was going to change the balancing policies because if he was then I wouldn’t demote myself. He reassured me that changes weren’t going to be made. Things were fine until the full-timers started to really complain and management saw that it was clearly unfair. 5 months after my change, they changed the balancing policies. Now I have lost my health insuranceand half of my pay. Was my supervisors verbal confirmation enough to get my position back? Since it was the only reason why I made the decision to do what I did.

Asked on February 26, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Nevada

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, unless you had a written agreement as to the minimum number of hours you would get, or that if you did not get those hours, you could return to full time, you most likely have no recourse. Without a written contract, all employment is employment at will, which means your status and hours can be whatever the employer wants, and you have no guarantee as to hours or full-time status.


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